Bacon and Egg Sandwich: BEC NYC Deli-Style

/

Bacon and Egg Sandwich: BEC NYC Deli-Style

Precise measurements. Fancy ingredients. Adherence to traditional methods. Sometimes a recipe can fail or fly depending on how much care and effort you put into the details. Then there’s that other sort. Recipes that simply cannot fail no matter what you do. Sure, these foolproof recipes are often simple to prepare. But that’s not what makes them guaranteed winners. An omelet is simple to prepare yet notoriously difficult to perfect. Not so with the humble egg sandwich. I don’t care how you make it or exactly what you put in it. As long as you’ve got eggs, cheese, and bread clutched in your fist you’re probably holding the best-sandwich-ever. Every time. In all its infinite variations.

Perhaps it’s in our DNA. Eggs are elemental on many levels and cheese never ceases to satisfy. I guess that’s why the egg sandwich simply cannot fail in any regard. It cannot fail to nourish. It cannot fail to please. It cannot fail to make me look twice every time I come across it on a menu. I may not order it every time I come across it, but when I don’t I find myself wondering what I missed.

Would it be…

…simple and glorious scrambled eggs with ham and cheese on toast?

…open-faced and fancy with Gruyère and herbs?

…made sweet and savory with apple butter and super sharp Cheddar?

…a contradictory fried egg white with Swiss cheese on an everything bagel?

…served Southern-style on a biscuit with cheese in every bite?

…folded into a tortilla with fried carnitas and green chilies?

…or, in the classic and possibly greatest conception. Crisp bacon, runny eggs, and melted cheese on a roll. A soft roll. The kind of roll you know you shouldn’t eat.

In NYC delis they call this sandwich the BEC and it deserves to be every bit as famous as the BLT because there’s never been a bad egg sandwich in the history of the world. Period. GREG

Bacon and Egg Sandwich: BEC NYC Deli-Style

Deli-Style Egg on a Roll

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 1Source Adapted from NYC DelisPublished

Ingredients

  • 1 soft roll (such as a Kaiser roll or brioche bun)
  • 3 tablespoon unsalted butter (at room temperature, divided)
  • 2 large eggs (at room temperature)
  • salt and pepper (for seasoning)
  • 1 slice sharp, white Cheddar cheese
  • 2 slice bacon (cooked until crisp, then halved crosswise)

Directions

Turn on the broiler.

Heat a large dry skillet over medium-high heat. Slice the roll horizontally and toast until hot and crispy. Set the roll aside and lower the heat on the skillet to medium.

Butter the toasted roll with a one tablespoon butter on each toasted side. Let the butter get absorbed and continue to work edge to edge using a whole tablespoon on each side of the bun.

Add the remaining tablespoon butter to the hot skillet. Once it melts and gets foamy crack the eggs into the skillet. Get them close enough to be touching. You want them co-joined. Cook the eggs over easy, taking care to keep the yolks intact when you flip them. Lightly season with salt and pepper.

Remove the skillet from the heat and roll the white under if necessary to make the eggs bun-sized. Lay a slice of cheese and 2 half strips of bacon crisscross on top of the eggs. Set the skillet under the broiler until the cheese just begins to melt, and the bacon softens somewhat about 1 minute. Remove from heat. Lay 2 remaining half pieces of bacon crisscross onto the bottom of the roll. Top these slices with the egg and cheese combination. Close the sandwich with the top of the buttered roll. Eat immediately.

Save

Save

Salmon Rillettes Will Never Go Out of Style

/

Salmon Rillettes

Potted Foods have nothing to do with the current rage for cannabis cuisine. If that’s what you want Google has sent you astray. The potted food I’m featuring is the type of dish that’s composed of meat, fat and seasonings served in the same ceramic or glass “pot” it was cured in. Of these, rillettes is a classic example. Traditionally rillettes is cooked meat cured in its own fat until unbelievably luscious. However, when it comes to Salmon Rillettes it becomes necessary to introduce some foreign fat. Salmon, though fatty for fish, simply doesn’t carry enough of its own fat. In this recipe, butter and egg yolk pair up to get the job done.

The process may be different but the results are the same: moist, succulent, flavorful.

Potted foods are a great way to start a meal with friends. They’re served communally, right from the container they were stored in. Meaning they’re easy to bring to the table and provide immediate social interaction. And by “social interaction” I mean sharing. There’s simply no better spirit with which to begin a meal than by sharing.

So why aren’t potted foods like Salmon Rillettes more popular in North American kitchens? They’re simple to make and can be prepared days ahead of the party. They’re both rustic and elegant so they feel appropriate for any occasion. Well, my theory is this. Salmon Rillettes and similar confit-style dishes were originally methods to store leftover food without refrigeration. Once mid-century refrigerators became the norm culinary methods of preservation began to fall out of fashion. However, the modern-day conveniences of a Frigidaire and Saran Wrap are not good enough reasons to abandon the traditions or techniques that brought us these dishes. Because the truth is– moist, succulent, and flavorful should never go out of style. GREG

Salmon Rillettes: Moist, Succulent and FlavorfulSalmon Rillettes: Moist, Succulent and Flavorful v

Smoked Salmon Rillettes

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 2 cupsSource Slightly adapted from Thomas KellerPublished

This is a large recipe, but it’s easily halved.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound center-cut wild-caught salmon (skin and pinbones removed, trimmed and dark flesh removed)
  • 2 tablespoon anise seeds
  • kosher salt and white pepper (as needed)
  • 8 tablespoon unsalted butter (divided)
  • ½ cup minced shallots
  • 1 tablespoon creme fraiche
  • 8 ounce un-sliced, chilled smoked salmon
  • 2 ½ tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon very good extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon fresh chives, finely chopped (optional )
  • clarified butter (for sealing)

Directions

Set out the butter and smoked salmon to bring them to room temperature. Cut the smoked salmon into a ¼″ dice.

Place the salmon fillet in a glass baking dish and sprinkle each side with 1 tbs of anise seeds, 1 tsp salt, and ¼ tsp white pepper. Refrigerate, covered with plastic wrap, for 1 hour, turning after 30 minutes.

Set up a pot with a steamer rack and bring the water in the bottom to a simmer. Add the salmon and steam gently until medium-rare, about 8 minutes. Alternatively, if you don’t have a steamer rack, you can poach the salmon.

Meanwhile, melt 1 tbs butter in a small pan over medium heat. Add the shallots, season with ¼ tsp salt, and saute, stirring, until softened, about 4-5 minutes. Don’t allow them to brown.

In a small bowl, stir the remaining 7 tbs butter until smooth and creamy. Add creme fraiche and stir to combine. Set aside.

When the steamed salmon has cooled somewhat scrape as many of the anise seeds off as possible. It’s ok if a few cling. Chop the steamed salmon roughly. The exact texture is up to you. Traditionally rillettes are served almost as a paste. But I find I prefer salmon rillettes with a bit more texture.

In a large bowl, combine chopped steamed salmon, diced smoked salmon, sauteed shallots, lemon juice, olive oil, egg yolks, and chives. Season with salt and white pepper. Fold in the butter mixture and combine well. Again, how much mixing you choose will determine texture.

Transfer salmon mixture to ramekins, canning jars, or pots, leaving a half inch of space at the top of each. Refrigerate 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat clarified butter over medium heat until liquid. Aloow it to cool somewhat then pour a ¼-inch or so layer of butter over each pot of salmon and return to the refrigerator to solidify.

To serve remove and discard the butter seal. Serve spread on toasted baguette, crackers, cucumber slices, or spoons.

Will keep up to one week while encased in butter. Once the butter is removed it should be consumed within a couple of days.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Shoes and Guy Larmandier Cramant Champagne! Life is good!

/

Chloe Boots and Guy Larmandier Cramant Champagne!

Today’s post is from my wine (and shoe) loving friend Helen. I like shoes as well as the next guy, but I wanted you to know who’s wearing the boots today. GREG

The way Carrie Bradshaw feels about shoes is the way I feel about wine. Watching Sarah Jessica Parker drool over a fancy pair of Minolo Blahniks’, would be akin to sharing the shimmering excitement I feel when confronted with a spectacular Dionysian bottle… but I am still a woman who can appreciate lovely footwear.

I had a lucky week. Much as I would love to earn a living drinking wine, in reality, I have spent the last twenty years working as a therapeutic massage therapist. I work in people’s homes and at a couple of high-end hotels. One of my hotel clients is in the fashion industry and he had a bag of Italian Suede boots in sample size in his room. He wondered if they might fit me, as he didn’t want to travel home with them. This Cinderella managed to magically slip into the Chloé boots as though they were made to measure for my feet alone. How can you top that?

Well, a few days later, another regular client presented me with a bottle of Champagne he had left over from his New Year’s Eve party. I may have mentioned to him, on occasion, that I LOVE Champagne. I may have proselytized that it is the only wine that can be enjoyably consumed at any time of the day, with any meal. It is possible that I may have previously explained my preference for the nutty, biscuit, rather than tart citrus flavors of this divine elixir. I will take Bollinger over Cristal any day. My client doesn’t really drink Champagne, so he said he would be interested in getting my feedback on it. “I hope it’s toasty,” he smiled as I glowed with giddy gratitude.

Guy Larmandier Cramant, Blanc de Blancs, Grand Cru Champagne

Guy Larmandier Cramant, Blanc de Blancs, Grand Cru ChampagneBy way of coincidence, my client had purchased this Guy Larmandier Cramant, Blanc de Blancs, Grand Cru Champagne at Helen’s Wine Shop, a stellar little haven for oenophiles tucked inside Jon and Vinny’s restaurant here in Los Angeles.

So this gift, bearing a pretty pink “helen’s” label, was like being handed a personalized bottle. Cramant, not to be confused with Crémant (a creamier style of sparkling wine), is a Grand Cru rated village in the Côtes Du Blancs region of Champagne. Guy Larmandier, is a small family run domaine. I have never had the opportunity to taste this Champagne before and I couldn’t wait to call Ken and Greg to arrange a get together to pop the cork. It is my opinion that all good Champagne tastes even better when consumed with great friends, which is why it is such a stellar party drink.

Corked popped, strawberries at the ready, we immediately noted the pale gold color on this 100% Chardonnay, suggesting a little age or oxidation. The bubbles are also a surprise: tiny, elegant and as mousse-like as a Cremant. That’s right, Crémant from Cramant, how fabulous! On the nose, a hint of hazelnuts and brioche. My heart started somersaulting… Toast! On the palate, ripe Bartlett pear, giving way to rich bitter almond cake, with a finish of sour sherbet at the back of the throat. We looked for citrus but didn’t find it. Instead, we found enough acidity to draw all the elements of this champagne into a cohesive balance. I loved it. It is worth mentioning that the subtlety of the bubbles might be caused by the apparent oxidation in this bottle, or it may be the unique character of this particular Champagne. The only way to know for sure is to try more 😉 Regardless, I have definitely added this Champagne to my list of favorites. In the company of friends, it provided a wonderful way to toast the good fortune of my week and the generosity of my clients.

Shoes and Champagne! Life is good! HELEN

Chloe Boots and Guy Larmandier Cramant Champagne! Life is good!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Post 1609: Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Cooked on the Grill

/

Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Cooked on the Grill

Grilling season is here. Blah blah blah. You should try these Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Skewers. They’re brushed with a sweet maple glaze and served with a side dish of golden beets and their greens. Blah blah blah. Bacon adds flavor. Blah blah blah. Besides, Bacon-Wrapped Salmon is far less likely to dry out when cooked over live fire. Blah blah blah. Salmon should be served pink in the center. Blah blah blah. Use an Insta-read thermometer so you don’t overcook the fish. I like to aim for an interior temperature of 120 to 125 degrees F. Blah blah blah. Of course, you should use the very best sustainable wild salmon you can find. Blah blah BLOG!

When it comes to blogging I often feel like it’s all been said before. No matter how passionate I feel about a subject, no matter how many clever words I use– sometimes all I can hear in my head is blah blah blah.

That’s probably because I’ve been pecking at this keyboard for 3157 days now. That’s 1609 posts over almost 9 years– or an average of one post every 47 hours.

However, don’t assume you hear violins playing my swan song. I’m not going to say I’m burned out, or threaten to quit blogging or make any kind of dramatic definitive statement. As long as there’s food on my table and words in my mouth I’ll probably keep blogging. This post is nothing more than my attempt to quiet the blahs.

I should have seen the signs of my mood coming when I chose salmon for this post. I love salmon. But let’s face it, salmon is hardly a stretch for most competent cooks. Salmon is often seen as a dull and predictable fish choice. In fact, there are more than thirty recipes for salmon on my blog alone. But the amazing thing is not one of those recipes is Bacon-Wrapped Salmon.

Which means after 8 years, 7 months, and 23 days into this blogging project I guess I’ve still got something left to say! Even if today it’s just these three dull words: blah blah blah. GREG

Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Cooked on the Grill

Maple Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Skewers with Beets and Greens

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 4Published
Maple Glazed Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Skewers with Beets and Greens

Ingredients

  • 1 pound golden beets, with fresh greens intact (about five 2 ½-inch beets weighed without their greens)
  • 3 clove garlic (peeled)
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ¼ cup water
  • olive oil (as needed)
  • kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper (as needed)
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 bunch green onions (about 6 ounces), both white and green parts cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 4-5 tablespoon maple syrup (divided)
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 ½ pound skinless king, coho or sockeye salmon (pin bones removed, cut into twelve to sixteen 1 ½-inch pieces)
  • 12-16 slice bacon

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Wash the beets and their greens well then remove the greens and stems; set them aside.

Arrange the beets on a roasting pan large enough to hold them in a single layer and add the garlic cloves, thyme, bay leaf, and water. Drizzle the mixture with ¼ cup olive oil and season generously with salt and black pepper. Cover tightly with foil and bake up to 1 hour, or until the beets are tender (start checking at 40 minutes); transfer to a large rimmed baking sheet and let cool somewhat; discard the liquid and aromatics.

While still somewhat warm peel and trim the beets and slice them into ½-inch thick rounds. Then cut the rounds into ½-inch dice. Drizzle beets with white wine vinegar and a little olive oil, tossing to coat. Set aside.

Warm 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet with a lid set over medium heat.

Slice the beet greens and stems crosswise into 1-inch ribbons. Add them, along with the green onions, to the large skillet with the warmed oil. Lower the heat and cover the skillet. Cook stirring occasionally until the beet stems are tender, 10 to 15 minutes, depending on the size and age of the greens.

Remove the skillet from the heat and stir in 2 tablespoons maple syrup, diced beets, and crushed red pepper. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, heat a grill or stovetop grill pan to medium heat. Soak four 8 to 10-inch bamboo skewers in water.

In a large bowl, combine 1 tablespoon olive oil with salmon. Toss to coat. Sprinkle salmon with salt and black pepper. Working with one piece at a time, wrap one bacon slice once or twice around each piece of salmon. Thread bacon-wrapped salmon pieces one at a time onto a skewer. Take care to secure the bacon in place with the skewer. Continue threading the bacon-wrapped salmon pieces 3 or 4 to a skewer leaving a small gap between reach piece.

Brush grill grate with olive oil. Brush each kabob with some of the remaining maple syrup on both sides. Place kebabs on grate and grill until the bacon crisps on the bottom. Brush more maple syrup on top, and then flip the kabobs over. Brush the other side with maple syrup and continue grilling until an instant-read thermometer reads 120-125°F for medium rare.

Serve immediately with warm beet greens.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp from the Gjelina Cookbook

/

Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp from the Gjelina Cookbook

In California, our wet winter is finished and I’m breathing a sigh of relief. Which isn’t to say I’m complaining about the rain. In fact, I’ve loved every little ping and pitter-patter on the copper awning outside my kitchen window. I’ve been happy cooking cool weather favorites like Bolognese too. But I’ll admit I spent quite a few chilly evenings by the fire bookmarking recipes for warmer days. Now that spring has come to our farmer’s markets its brought asparagus, peas, fava beans, strawberries, and rhubarb, which means it’s finally time to try out those dog-eared recipes I collected. At the top of my list is this Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp from the Gjelina cookbook.

Rhubarb is a vegetable that masquerades as a fruit. That’s because it’s so pretty it blushes, ranging from pale green to deep red depending on growing conditions. Rhubarb may wear a flamboyant crimson frock, but it can be so tart it verges on astringent. It tends to fall into the “love it” or “hate it” category. Whether it’s roasted, pickled or turned into a cocktail, I’m a lover not a hater. Its classic partner is strawberries, and they often show up together in desserts such as this polenta crisp.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp Prep WorkStrawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp Prep Work

Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp

Like all crisps, this recipe is a snap to put together and seems well-suited to adaptations. Feel free to experiment with other seasonal fruits throughout the year. What sets this crisp apart, however, is the inclusion of polenta in the topping. I first read about a polenta as a topping for crisps on the David Lebovitz blog but have never gotten around to trying it– that is until I came across the Travis Lett version this past winter. What I think you’ll love about this recipe is that the polenta provides both a crunchiness and a sweetness that highlight the soft texture and sharp tang of baked rhubarb. GREG

Polenta Crisp Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp

Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 10-12Source Travis LettPublished

This is a large recipe. I divided both the finished dough and filling in half and baked them in separate 9×9-inch baking pans on different days.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Polenta Crisp

Ingredients

  • 155 gram unsalted butter (chilled and cut into ½-inch cubes)
  • 120 gram (plus 2 tablespoons) all purpose flour (divided)
  • 80 gram quick-cooking polenta
  • 65 gram (plus ½ cup) granulated sugar (divided)
  • 1 large egg
  • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 pinch kosher salt (divided)
  • 3 pound fresh strawberries (hulled and halved)
  • 2 large stalks rhubarb (thinly sliced crosswise)
  • 1 lemon (juice only)

Directions

To make the topping: In a food processor, combine the butter, 120 grams flour, polenta, 65 grams sugar, egg, baking powder, and a pinch of salt. Pulse ten times or until a crumbly dough forms. Refrigerate until you are ready to use. (The topping can be made up to 1 week in advance and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator.)

To make the filling: In a large bowl, gently combine the strawberries and rhubarb with the remaining ½ cup sugar, remaining 2 tablespoons flour, lemon juice, and remaining pinch of salt.

Pour the filling into a 10-by-14-in baking dish. Crumble the topping over the top. Bake until the crisp is lightly browned and the filling is bubbling 30 to 40 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack for 40 minutes.

Put a generous scoop of the warm crisp into each dessert dish to serve.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Vegetarian Tacos with Grilled Broccolini and Shiitake Mushrooms

/

vegetarian tacos with grilled broccolini and shiitake mushrooms

Los Angeles is a city of new ideas. Trends start here. And I’ve been noticing a trend. Actually, it seems to be well past a trend and entering the mainstream. If you’ve been out to eat lately, chances are you see what I see: vegetables getting the star treatment. Dishes we typically think of as meat-centric often feature far less flesh than you’d expect. In fact, many traditionally meaty choices have gone vegetarian. There’s beet tartare and cauliflower steak. Bolognese is getting jazzed up with veggies too. There are even plenty of exciting choices for something I once considered taboo— vegetarian tacos.

Vegetarian Tacos

Los Angeles is known for a lot of things. I’d smugly offer that our thriving taco scene is one of them. That’s because Mexican food is the heartbeat of so much of what we eat here. We’re also a city on-the-go. Tacos were actually invented for an on-the-go lifestyle. At the same time, you simply cannot find better produce anywhere in the world. I guess that’s why there’s always been a large vegetarian scene sharing the same street corners with our ubiquitous taco stands. Naturally, these two worlds have melded. From Tacos de Calabacitas at Guisados to Danny Trejo’s Roasted Cauliflower Tacos with Grilled Corn and Cashews. Chefs aren’t just trying to come up with meat substitutes but are actually rethinking tacos to create something new and altogether satisfying. This type of culinary creativity means I’ve become a big fan of vegetarian tacos and find myself experimenting whenever I can.

That’s because vegetarian tacos aren’t as much of a stretch of the imagination as you might think. Dishes made with mushrooms, corn, peppers, eggplant, and cauliflower all have some traditional regional Mexican roots and taste right at home tucked into tortillas.

Vegetarian Tacos with Grilled Broccolini and Shiitake MushroomsVegetarian Tacos with Grilled Broccolini and Shiitake Mushrooms

Grilled Broccolini and Shiitake Tacos

Even something as untypically Mexican as broccolini works well when layered with the flavors of char and chipotle. That’s because tacos, in their purest primal form, are guided by one simple rule: tacos take care and pride but not much fuss. As long as they’re built on warm, supple corn tortillas that fit in the palm of your hand, just about anything can be folded inside and minimally adorned with onion, cilantro, and hot sauce. GREG

vegetarian tacos with grilled broccolini and shiitake mushrooms

Grilled Broccolini and Shiitake Tacos

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 8Published
Grilled Broccolini and Shiitake Tacos

Ingredients

  • 1 pound broccolini (if you can find some with greens attached, all the better))
  • kosher salt (as needed)
  • iced water (as needed for ice bath)
  • ¼ cup canola oil (or other mild flavored oil)
  • 3 clove garlic (peeled and minced)
  • 2 tablespoon ground chipotle chile (or more to taste)
  • 8 ounce shiitake mushrooms (stems trimmed)
  • 8-10 green onions (trimmed)
  • 8 corn tortillas (warm)
  • guacamole (for serving, to taste)
  • lime wedges (for serving, to taste)
  • cilantro (for serving, to taste)
  • ½ cup diced red onion (for serving, to taste)
  • hot sauce (for serving, to taste)

Directions

Prepare a gas or charcoal grill to medium-high heat, or set a grill pan over medium-high heat.

Meanwhile, to blanch the broccolini, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and set a large bowl of ice water next to the stove. Divide the broccolini into three bunches according to similar thicknesses and place one bunch into the boiling water. Cook until bright green and slightly tender, about 2 to 3 minutes depending on thickness; transfer to the ice water. Repeat with the remaining broccolini bunches. Drain and transfer to a towel to dry.

On a large, rimmed baking sheet, combine oil, garlic, half the chipotle powder, and a few big pinches of salt. Add broccolini, shiitakes, and green onions; toss to coat. Sprinkle with remaining chipotle powder.

Transfer vegetables to the grill and lay each piece flat across the grates (you may use a grill basket if you like). Cook until the florets on the broccolini begin to char lightly about 3 minutes. Flip and cook all the vegetables on the other side until nicely colored and softened. The green onions will finish first, followed by the broccolini and finally the mushrooms. You might find it helpful to use a heavy pan or bacon press to assure the vegetables lie flat against the grates. Use your judgment. Transfer vegetables to a cutting board as they finish cooking. If your grilling area is not large enough to accommodate all the vegetables then grill each vegetable type separately.

Chop broccolini florets into big bites and cut the broccolini stalks and green onions into 2 to 3-inch lengths. Thinly slice the shiitakes. Serve with warm corn tortillas, guacamole, lime wedges, cilantro, red onion and hot sauce.

 

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

A Crazy Chicken Cheeseburger Collaboration

/

A Crazy Chicken Cheeseburger Collaboration

Collaboration: the action of working with someone to produce or create something. I consider this blog a collaboration. Sometimes my co-collaborators are aware of the teamwork as in my recent Dierberg Vineyard Wine Pairing Meal. But sometimes I get inspired by someone or something without anybody getting the connection– besides myself of course. This Chicken Cheeseburger is an example of the latter form of collusion. It (unwittingly) involves Chef Curtis Stone, of the Los Angeles restaurants Gwen and Maude, and the team behind local food truck NoMad.

Since launching six months ago the truck has partnered with local chefs to create special monthly collaboration burgers, including Ludo Lefebvre, Roy Choi, and Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo.

Just to be clear. None of the aforementioned culinary geniuses knew I was going to get my hands on Stone’s ground chicken and truffle pâté burger recipe and take it even one step further towards craziness. After all, it was headlined in the Los Angeles Times recently as a “Crazy Chicken Burger”. I’m sure they considered this little bit of chicken virtuosity a done-deal.

Pretzel slider bunsChicken Cheeseburger Slider

A Chicken Cheeseburger with Bacon, Sauerkraut, and Truffle?

After all, to quote the Times this truffled chicken cheeseburger is loaded up with “house-cured bacon, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, watercress and a caraway mustard and buttermilk dressing… including a total of three slices of cheese per burger and a tangy sauerkraut to help cut the richness.”

But I wondered as I read the recipe how much more would be too much more…

Well, my question was soon answered. Again according to the Times this chicken cheeseburger features “a Bavarian flavor profile” and therefore “the only thing missing is the pretzel.”

Well, it’s not missing the pretzel anymore. I served their chicken cheeseburger on my pretzel slider rolls. So who’s the crazy collaborator now? GREG

Truffle Chicken Cheeseburger Prep A Crazy Chicken Cheeseburger Collaboration

Chicken and Truffle Cheeseburger with Bacon, Sauerkraut, and Caraway

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 6-8Source Adapted from a recipe by chefs Daniel Humm and Curtis StonePublished

This recipe appears here as it did in the Los Angeles Times on March 22, 2017. I adapted this recipe slightly to accommodate my Pretzel Slider Buns. Burger sizes and cooking times need to be adjusted if you plan to enjoy these as mini-burgers as I did.

Chicken and Truffle Cheeseburger with Bacon, Sauerkraut, and Caraway

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground chicken thighs
  • 3 teaspoon teaspoons black truffle pâté
  • ½ teaspoon truffle oil
  • 3 tablespoon (heaping) fresh brioche bread crumbs
  • kosher salt (as needed)
  • 1 ½ teaspoon whole caraway seeds
  • ¼ cup plus 2 teaspoons, creme fraiche
  • 1 ½ tablespoon buttermilk
  • 2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ⅓ cup Dijon mustard
  • 4 chicken patties (as prepared from above)
  • freshly cracked black pepper (as needed)
  • 12 slice (about 4 ounces total) Swiss cheese
  • 4 burger buns (or 8 for the slider-sized version) sliced crosswise
  • ½ cup
  • 1 bunch watercress (washed, dried and thickest stems removed)

Directions

CHICKEN PATTIES
In a bowl, knead together the chicken, truffle pâté and oil, bread crumbs and ¼ teaspoon kosher salt. Divide the mixture and form it into 4 quarter-pound sized patties, or 6-8 slider-sized versions (depending on thickness). Set aside.

CARAWAY DRESSING WITH DIJON
In a dry skillet, toast the caraway seeds over medium heat, shaking or stirring frequently, until lightly browned and aromatic, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat. Grind the seeds to a powder using a spice grinder or mortar and pestle.

In a bowl, whisk together the caraway powder, creme fraiche, buttermilk, lemon juice, mustard and a pinch of salt, or to taste. This makes a scant ¾ cups dressing, which will keep, covered and refrigerated, up to 5 days.

NOMAD FOOD TRUCK COLLABORATION BURGER
Heat a grill or grill pan over medium-high heat until hot. Meanwhile, season each chicken patty lightly with salt and pepper on each side.

Lightly char the cooked bacon on the grill until warmed through. Remove and set aside.

Cook the patties until charred and cooked through, about 5 minutes on each side depending on the thickness of the burgers (or about 3 minutes on each side for the slider-sized version). Place a spoonful of sauerkraut on top of each patty, followed by 3 slices of cheese and 3 strips of bacon (halve the cheese slices and bacon for the slider-sized version). Set aside so the heat from the burgers can begin to melt the cheese. Toast each half of each bun.

To assemble the burgers, spread 1 tablespoon of the dressing on each half of each bun (2 scant teaspoons for the slider-sized version) or more if desired. Divide watercress on the base of each bun. Top the watercress with a prepared burger or slider, then season with a twist of freshly ground pepper. Top with the remaining bun half. Serve immediately.

Pretzel Slider Buns

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 16Source Adapted from Bon AppétitPublished
Pretzel Slider Buns

Ingredients

  • 2 3/4 cup bread flour
  • 1 envelope quick-rising yeast
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt (plus more for sprinkling)
  • 6 teaspoon granulated sugar (divided)
  • 1 teaspoon celery seeds
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons, very warm water (about 125°F)
  • cornmeal (as needed for baking sheets)
  • 8 cup water
  • ¼ cup baking soda
  • 1 egg white (beaten to blend as glaze)
  • sesame seeds (optional, as needed)

Directions

Combine bread flour, 1 envelope yeast, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon sugar and celery seeds in food processor and blend. With machine running, gradually pour hot water through feed tube, adding enough water to form smooth elastic dough. Process 1 minute to knead. Grease medium bowl. Add dough to the bowl, turning to coat. Cover bowl with plastic wrap, then towel; let the dough rise in warm draft-free area until doubled in volume, about 35 minutes.

Flour baking sheet. Punch dough down and knead on lightly floured surface until smooth. Divide into 16 pieces. Form each dough piece into ball. Place dough balls on prepared sheet, flattening each slightly. Cover with a towel and let dough balls rise until almost doubled in volume, about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375°F. Grease another baking sheet and sprinkle with cornmeal. Bring 8 cups water to boil in large saucepan. Add baking soda and 5 teaspoons sugar (water will foam up). Add 4 rolls and cook 30 seconds per side. Using slotted spoon, transfer rolls to prepared sheet. Repeat with remaining rolls.

Brush rolls with egg white glaze. Roll each ball through a small pile of either kosher salt or sesame seeds (or try BOTH) until coated to taste. Bake rolls until brown, about 25 minutes. Transfer to racks and cool.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Dierberg Vineyard Wine Pairing Meal

/

Dierberg Wine Pairing Meal

Same wine. Same meal. Two different wine lovers. How many opinions? That’s the challenge I set for Helen and Ken. I’d recently been sent samples of two estate wines from Dierberg Vineyard: a Chardonnay and a Pinot Noir. Both of these Santa Barbara County wines are new to me, but I am familiar enough with the Santa Maria Valley where they were produced that I thought I could successfully pair them with a simple vegetarian meal for friends.

But this wasn’t to be just another dinner party featuring delicious food and the wine I’ve chosen to compliment the meal. This was to be a wine pairing dinner where I’d ask two people whose wine knowledge I trust to give me a blind assessment of the wine and the food I’ve paired it with. The only rule I set was there was to be no consultation between the tasters. Would the wine be appreciated? Would my culinary choices stroll hand-in-hand with the wine or walk all over it? Sure I have some general knowledge of the pairing Chardonnays and Pinots Noirs, but every wine is different and nuanced. Just what would Helen and Ken think? Of course, taste is subjective, so I couldn’t be sure of anything. True to form, no sooner had we sat down than the rules began to change! But I’ll Helen start the story. GREG

“Positively no conferring,” Greg instructed, “I want your individual takes on these two wines.” Easier said than done because Ken and I are used to bouncing our tasting notes off each other. Ken immediately let slip two words, “Not cloying,” about a split second after I had jotted down a sentence ending with the two words, “…without cloying.” Of course, I had to wave my notes around for a moment to prove my independent but identical discovery about the Chardonnay. Other than that, here are my notes about these two delicious wines and I am as interested as anyone to discover how similar or deranged Ken’s notes are in comparison to mine 😉 HELEN

Dierberg 2013 Chardonnay Santa Maria Valley

The Wine: Dierberg 2013 Chardonnay Santa Maria Valley

HELEN: A topaz colored elixir sparkled in the glass, with stewed apple on the nose, along with a little mango rind. Tasted on its own, this delicious wine offers bright acidity with very subtle malolactics, giving a rich mouthfeel, without cloying. 

KEN: Blazingly bright gold to the eye, the Dierberg 2013 Chardonnay Santa Maria Valley promises to be a jewel of a wine. On the nose, lush yellow tree fruit, golden apple, is supported by a whiff of minerality foretelling freshness. The palate delivers a nice acidity. The dryness of the wine is a pleasant surprise considering the viscous gold color that could have portended a cloying drinking experience. Bosc pear is the predominant fruit delivered with some spice (nutmeg?) and the promised mineral notes.

The Food Pairing: White Salad of Cauliflower, Endive, Pears and Grapes

KEN: As for the experience when sampled along with Greg’s salad, the pear pairs perfectly while the acid cuts the buttermilk in the dressing. The round rich mouthfeel is further supported by the sweet green grapes while the crunchy caramelized cauliflower and the bitter endive provide a balancing contrast. When sipped with the food this new-style California Chardonnay seems even brighter– less oak, more spice and plenty of quenching acidity.

HELEN: Paired with Greg’s White Salad, the acidity pops even more brightly with notes of citrus and stone to create a wonderfully harmonious compliment to the tastes and textures of the salad. This is a divine old-world style Chardonnay and supremely food-friendly.

White Salad

White Salad of Cauliflower, Endive, Pears and Grapes

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 4Source Adapted from Katie MorrisPublished
White Salad of Cauliflower, Endive, Pears and Grapes

Ingredients

  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • ⅓ cup Greek yogurt
  • 3 ounce crumbled feta cheese
  • 2 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • kosher salt and black pepper (as needed for seasoning)
  • ½ head cauliflower (florets cut into thin slices)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 Belgian endives (cut crosswise into thin slices, core sections removed as needed)
  • 1 ripe pear (cored and sliced)
  • 1-2 cup green grapes (to taste)
  • 2 tablespoon pine nuts (lightly toasted in a dry pan)

Directions

Make the dressing: Add buttermilk, Greek yogurt, crumbled feta cheese, and lemon juice to a blender. Place the lid firmly on top and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Set aside.

Roast the cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 400F.

Toss the cauliflower slices with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Spread onto a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet in as close to a single layer as possible. Roast until just beginning to color on the bottoms, flip and roast 2 or 3 minutes more. Set aside to cool on the parchment.

Assemble the salad: Toss the roasted cauliflower with the sliced endive. Divide between 4 plates and top each salad with a few slices of pear, a handful of grapes, and a sprinkling of pine nuts.

Drizzle some of the prepared dressing on top of each salad, refrigerating any extra dressing for another use.

Dierberg 2013 Pinot Noir Santa Maria ValleyThe Wine: Dierberg 2013 Pinot Noir Santa Maria Valley

KEN: The color of this Dierberg 2013 Pinot Noir is a captivating deep ruby, but I couldn’t wait to stick my nose in the glass. I love a good vegetal funk, reminiscent of an old-world Burgundy. The nose shows spice, black cherry, maybe even a bit of French garrigue (wild rosemary, lavender, and thyme)– quite aromatic. Looking forward to a taste! The palate delivers: dark fruit, tart cherry, white pepper, acid, and salinity. A well-structured and complex Pinot Noir, more “masculine” with a substantial backbone and long finish.

HELEN: A beautiful nose of cherry cola reaches out of the glass, chased by a hint of forest funk. Yummy. On the palate, a gorgeous dance of chewy licorice and sandlewood spice plays with a kick of green pepper.

The Food Pairing: Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Mushrooms and Kale

HELEN: I don’t think that Greg could have come up with a more perfect food pairing for this wine. Every element of the sandwich finds a flavor partner in the wine to sing with: the Gruyere highlights the unabashedly masculine quality of the wine, inviting the vegetal backbone to lead over the fruit; the feel of the forest is intensified as the wine’s sultry notes of earth and spice are mirrored in the kale and mushrooms; likewise, the rye bread marries perfectly to the licorice notes in the pinot. The BBQ chips Greg served alongside the sandwich are a revelation to me, softening all the individual notes back into a sumptuous chorus of sensual experience.

KEN: What a great way to elevate the humble grilled cheese sandwich! We have the contrast of buttery (melted cheese) versus acidic (well, acid) and the complimentary flavors of garrigue and rye bread. The spice of the BBQ chips works with the spicy notes in the wine (who’d’ve thought?). Lastly, the umami from sautéed mushrooms brings an otherworldly level of depth. A very well executed California Pinot Noir at home in formal or informal settings.

Easy Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Mushrooms and Kale

Easy Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Mushrooms and Kale

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 4Published
Easy Grilled Cheese Sandwich with Mushrooms and Kale

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 medium portobello mushrooms (caps and gills removed and then sliced)
  • 1 cup diced onion
  • 2 clove garlic (peeled and chopped)
  • 4 cup loosely packed, chopped black kale leaves (or other sturdy green such as collards)
  • ½ cup water
  • salt and pepper (as needed for seasoning)
  • 8 slice good rye bread
  • 4 tablespoon grainy mustard (or to taste)
  • 8 sandwich sized thin slices Gruyere cheese
  • 8 tablespoon unsalted butter

Directions

Chop the mushroom slices into ½-inch chunks.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms and onion; cook, stirring occasionally, until starting to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add kale and water; reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, until the kale is tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Season with pepper and salt; set aside.

Brush one side of each slice of bread with grainy mustard. Lay mustard side up on a work surface and top 4 slices with one-fourth of the kale mixture (about ½ cup) and 2 slices of cheese each. Close the sandwiches with the remaining bread slices.

Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Melt the butter in the pan, swirling to coat. Grill the sandwiches in the melted butter until golden brown on both sides and the cheese is melted. Serve immediately.

We were sent samples from Dierberg Vineyard for the purpose of this tasting menu. All opinions are our own.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Dinner: Changing The Game by Melissa Clark

/

Dinner: Changing The Game by Melissa Clark

My first impression of the new cookbook Dinner: Changing The Game by Melissa Clark is that it might be an aggressive example of what marketing geniuses call “on-trend”. Caramelized Brussels Sprouts, check. Crunchy Chickpeas, check. Labneh, check. Harrisa, tamarind, and za’atar, but of course. Do you love Sichuan, Thai, and Middle-Eastern? Well, all the current darlings of the culinary globe are colorfully represented. There’s even a whole chapter dedicated to topping some yummy something with an egg. Oh and just in case this book should lose some of its market share to Molly Gilbert – they expertly chose to put a sheet pan supper right on the cover.

But this book cannot simply be dismissed as another timely collaboration between a great cook and the marketing geniuses attached to her apron strings. Because the truth is Melissa Clark has an uncanny grasp of what people want in the moment – and she always has. Unlike many writers who might choose to put both seitan and newly chic butcher cuts of steak in their books because they think they’re supposed to, Clark actually gets the rhythm of how people eat these days. More importantly, she knows how cooks want to spend their time in the kitchen. Which means Dinner: Changing The Game is cookbook you’ll want to take seriously.

Dinner: Changing The Game by Melissa Clark

There are more than 200 recipes in Dinner and none of them are fluff. Which isn’t to say you won’t have to put some effort into finding just what it is you want for “dinner”. It’s easy to get distracted by all the choices and all the differing styles. I decided to spend some time with the book before I committed to a direction for this post.

The sausage recipes in this book (there are nine) immediately caught my eye. But as I flipped through the pages I began to get excited by a chicken dish loaded up with all the flavors of your favorite take-out pizza. Now that sounds creative! Of course, I’ve also been looking for an approachable Sichuan recipe to get an introduction to bold flavor combinations. I found a Crispy Salt & Pepper Pork with Sichuan Peppercorns on page 85 that fits the bill.

As I said the choices in this book are very diverse and appealing. But are they too diverse and too appealing? Hmmm…

Sometimes when I’m feeling overwhelmed I find it best to motivate myself with a real-world application. So, in the case of this cookbook, I decided to have a real-world dinner for eight. What better way to put this book to the test?

It’s been unseasonably warm in Los Angeles and a casual outdoor event seemed a logical choice. After all, the first al fresco dinner party of the season is always a festive occasion. With my parameters set, I found it much easier to navigate the book. The weather seems to suit a Mediterranean menu, so I put my focus onto recipes with a Middle-Eastern flair. Besides, I’ve been diddling with an extra jazzy za’atar mix and this menu seems like a good time to unveil it.

“Each recipe in Dinner is meant to be dinner—one fantastic dish that is so satisfying and flavor-forward it can stand alone—or be paired with a simple salad or fresh bread on the side. This is what Melissa Clark means by changing the game.”

That’s a quote from the publisher, so you know it’s true. I, however, found the range of choices well-suited to a larger event of family-style passed plates and had no trouble choosing three compatible recipes to suit the tastes of my guests. I figured whether they filled their plates with just one choice or went all-in—this would be a Dinner worth sharing with friends. GREG

Horta Salad with Feta and Olives and Pomegranate Quinoa with Crunchy Chickpeas

Dinner Melissa Clark

Za’atar Chicken with Lemon Yogurt (Adapted for Skewers)

Dinner Melissa Clark

I was sent a review copy of Dinner: Changing The Game by Melissa Clark. All opinions are my own. Also, I never heard back from the publicist about sharing recipes. So out of an abundance of caution, the only recipe I’m passing along today is my own recipe for the Za’atar I used in the chicken marinade.

Za’atar Spice Mix

Za’atar Spice Mix Recipe

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 1 ½ cupPublished
Za’atar Spice Mix Recipe

Ingredients

  • ½ cup dried thyme
  • ½ cup toasted unhulled sesame seeds
  • ¼ cup ground sumac
  • 2 tablespoon dried marjoram
  • 2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground anise
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin

Directions

Stir all ingredients together. Seal and store up to 3 months.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

You Bought Escarole! Now What?

/

Cichorium endivia Endive Escarole

One of the pleasures of living in Southern California — and there are many — is the availability of unusual vegetables. Many of them are specialized versions of something you already love, like the Martian green Romanesco cauliflower. Some are exotic varieties from another hemisphere, such as oca, a technicolor root vegetable that can’t decide if it wants to be an Easter egg or a potato. Others like puntarelle are so crazy you might not know what to do with them. Then there are classic, old-world vegetables that aren’t so much unusual as they are unusually hard to come by. I’m talking about the chicories like escarole and curly endive.

Romanesco Cauliflower and Oca

Romanesco Cauliflower and Oca

Puntarelle

Puntarelle

Cichorium endivia: Escarole and Curly Endive

The best examples of escarole or curly endive are a full 12 inches across with creamy yellow hearts in a nest of spiky green leaves pointing out in all directions. These heads are so big they can hardly be stuffed into a bag. Once home, they fill the refrigerator drawer so tightly it will barely close. When you’re done wrangling one of these chicories you’ll probably wonder why you even bought such a thing.

Well, don’t fret, when you’re lucky enough to come across a perfect specimen it’s a thrill to carry it home and explore all its possibilities. After all, it’s so large and its taste and texture are so varied that there are several wonderful things that can be done with just one head of chicory.

The tightly bound tendrils in the center are very tender with just a hint of the bitterness that tells you they belong to the chicory family. Use these pale inside leaves in a delicately dressed salad or as a garnish on a simple veggie crostini drizzled with very good olive oil.

The further from the center of the escarole you go the bolder your culinary creations can get. These leaves can be torn it into pieces and thrown into soups. Try a salad with creamy dressing and crunchy croutons. A classic version involves pork belly lardons and a poached egg. Farther from the center, the palm-sized leaves are sturdy enough to support warm salads or get baked into a frittata. The spiky outermost sections can be braised, sauteed, and even grilled to tame their wildest tendencies.

It’s these outer leaves I’d like to feature today in a pasta riff on a classic French bistro-inspired warm chicken liver salad that’s always sharp with vinegar and rich with chicken fat. All I’ve done is add pasta. Pappardelle with Escarole, Sautéed Chicken Livers and Caramelized Shallots. GREG

Pappardelle with Sautéed Chicken Livers and Escarole

Pappardelle with Sautéed Chicken Livers and Escarole

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 2-4Source Inspired by Michele Lamy and Melissa ClarkPublished

You may substitute curly endive or another bitter green from the chicory family.

Pappardelle with Sautéed Chicken Livers and Escarole

Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoon olive oil (divided)
  • 3 clove garlic (peeled and sliced)
  • ¼ pound escarole (trimmed, leaves torn and washed well, see note)
  • kosher salt (as needed for seasoning)
  • ½ pound dried pappardelle pasta (or other wide flat noodle)
  • 2 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • ½ cup thinly sliced shallots
  • 2 teaspoon minced rosemary leaves
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (or more to taste)
  • 1 pound chicken livers (cleaned and cut into 1-inch chunks)
  • 1 clove garlic (peeled and minced)
  • 2 tablespoon dry vermouth
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar (or more to taste)
  • freshly cracked black pepper (as needed for seasoning)
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley

Directions

In a large skillet, warm 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add sliced garlic, and cook until fragrant and just beginning to color, about 2 minutes. Stir in escarole; season with salt. Cook, stirring frequently, until just beginning to wilt, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add pappardelle, and cook until al dente. Reserve 1 cup pasta water; drain pasta, and transfer to a large bowl. Toss the noodles with the cooked escarole, butter and half of the reserved pasta water. Set aside.

Heat 2 more tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add shallots, rosemary, and crushed red pepper; cook stirring often until golden brown and crunchy at the edges, about 6 minutes.

Raise the heat to medium-high add remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, swirling the pan to coat. Add chicken livers in as close to a single layer as possible and cook without disturbing them until well browned on the bottom, about 1-2 minutes. Add the minced garlic, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in the vermouth and vinegar, scraping the bottom with a wooden spoon to release the browned bits. Continue to cook until the chicken livers are cooked through, but still pink on the inside, 1 to 2 more minutes more.

Scrape the chicken livers into the bowl with the pappardelle and escarole. Stir in the parsley and remaining pasta water if the mixture seems dry. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save