Grilled Treviso and Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette

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Grilled Treviso and Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette

Radicchio (pronounced ra-DEE-key-o) is the Italian name for a large group of red chicories. You may know radicchio as the red flecks found floating among emaciated lettuce leaves in vacuum-packed bags of salad. That variety is typically Radicchio di Chioggia. Which can be delicious, don’t get me wrong. But sadly, in the salad bag example, the radicchio seems to be there strictly for the color it brings to cellophane. Please, don’t let that color your opinion of radicchio. As I said it’s a varied group of leafy vegetables. It deserves your attention. So, may I direct that attention to my favorite radicchio variety? That would be Radicchio di Treviso. Specifically, grilled Treviso.

And I’m not alone in that opinion. The radicchio that Italians eat most often is Treviso (smell me!).

Radicchio di Treviso is as red as the mini-cabbage doppelganger, Radicchio di Chioggia. However, rather than looking like tight little fists, Treviso is missile-shaped. Sort of like a gawky overgrown adolescent Belgian endive.

As a former gawky adolescent, how could I not love Radicchio di Treviso? Sadly, I don’t come across it very often in the markets in my neighborhood. So when I see it, I grab it and I grill it. Once grilled Treviso loses a little of the bitterness that some people find challenging and becomes a terrific base for a grilled vegetable salad.

TrevisoRoast Cherry Tomatoes

Grilled Treviso with Proven Favorites

Well, when confronted with hard to come by ingredients I tend to gravitate to classic preparations and proven winners. One of my favorite condiments is a tomato “vinaigrette” recipe from Alison Roman. It appeared in Bon Appétit some time ago. Long enough ago that I basically consider this recipe my own. These days I follow the original recipe only loosely and adapt it as my pantry dictates. Sometimes I add capers, sometimes I add or subtract herbs, sometimes I add garlic. You get the idea. I love the texture of this “vinaigrette”. And just so you know those pesky quotation marks are there because it’s the texture that makes this condiment nothing like any vinaigrette you will find in a bottle marked Wishbone. It’s a chunky dressing, more like salsa than sauce.

The only problem I face is this: cherry tomato season comes with warm weather but Treviso peaks well before that. So, without consulting Alison Roman, I roasted off-season cherry tomatoes to use in her familiar vinaigrette to amplify their sugars. You’ve done that too, right?

While on the subject of amplifying flavors I’ve done the same thing with some early season corn. It’s grilled. The cheese gets its own larger than life presence on the plate too. I’ve chosen a 75% butterfat Délice de Bourgogne triple cream. If you’re not familiar with triple cream I’ll say this– most Bries are double cream (60% butterfat) so you get the idea. GREG

Délice de Bourgogne Grilled Treviso and Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette

Grilled Treviso and Corn Salad with Roasted Tomato “Vinaigrette”

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 2-4Source Adapted from Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez DentonPublished
Grilled Treviso and Corn Salad with Roasted Tomato “Vinaigrette”

Ingredients

  • 2 heads Treviso (halved lengthwise)
  • 2-3 ears corn (husked and cleaned)
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • salt and pepper (as needed)
  • 2-3 cup baby arugula
  • roasted tomato vinaigrette (see recipe https://www.sippitysup.com/recipe/roasted-tomato-vinaigrette/ )
  • 4-6 ounce chilled Deelice de Bourgogne cheese (or similar bloomy washed rind cheese, sliced into thin wedges)

Directions

Prepare the grill to medium-high heat.

Place the Treviso halves and corn on the cob onto a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil to coat all sides and in between some of the leaves. Season generously in the same manner with salt and black pepper. Transfer the corn to the grill and cook, turning often until the kernels are cooked and charred in places, about 10 minutes. Remove the corn from the grill, let cool slightly, then slice the kernels off. Set aside.

Place the Treviso onto the grill, cut side down, and cook until wilted and charred, about 3 minutes. Turn each piece over and grill another 2 or 3 minutes. Remove from grill. Cut out the core, chop the leaves crosswise into large chunks. The corn and Treviso may be grilled several hours in advance or served warm from the grill if you prefer.

To serve arrange the Treviso and arugula on a large serving platter or on individual plates then top with sections of corn kernels. Spoon the vinaigrette over the vegetables, making sure to evenly distribute the tomatoes. Garnish with cheese wedges.

Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette

Print This Recipe Total time Yield 4-6Published

This vinaigrette is best if used within an hour of adding the tomatoes to the vinegar mixture.

Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • 1 pint whole cherry or grape tomatoes
  • 3/4 cup olive oil (divided)
  • 2 teaspoon kosher salt (divided)
  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

In a medium bowl toss the tomatoes with 2 tablespoons olive oil and 1 teaspoon salt. When well-coated spread them out onto a parchment-lined baking sheet. Roast in the heated oven until they begin to get a little dimpled and just beginning to color, about 15 minutes. Remove from oven.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine vinegar, remaining olive oil, the remaining salt, and the black pepper. Add the roasted tomatoes and gently toss to combine. Set aside until ready to use.

Grilled Treviso and Roasted Tomato Vinaigrette

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